The Unlikely Story Behind New York City’s First 100% Grass-fed Meat Company

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The Unlikely Story Behind New York City’s First 100% Grass-fed Meat Company

It’s hard to eat right in a city that moves as fast as New York. Late nights at work, inhumane deadlines and soul sucking commutes usually add up to less than stellar decision making when it comes to choosing what to eat. 

Those subways ads don’t make it easy, either.

Those subways ads don’t make it easy, either.

 

I’ve been there...ravenously scrolling through the scant delivery options still available at 11pm. Sometimes your thumb has a mind of it’s own. In these situations, it’s hard to know where your food comes from; and I don’t just mean whether or not the pad thai that’s warming your lap is from Thai 101 or Thaiholics.

I’m talking about where your food is actually from...particularly the ingredients.

Learning To Eat Right

Eating right is more than just fanatically auditing the nutritional facts of every label. It’s about knowing the story and the upbringing behind what you’re eating, too. My world has always revolved around athletics and, naturally, that meant striving to maintain peak physical performance. When I started playing football as a kid, I never thought twice about what I was eating, let alone the nefarious hormones and chemicals that lurked inside. But over time I learned that what I put in my body has a direct effect on what my body can put out.

It’s cliché, but you really are what you eat. And the food that feeds you needs to be fed well, too.

Ironically, New York was where I eventually learned about the connection we all have, whether we know it or not, to what we eat.

One of many trips to the Poconos.

One of many trips to the Poconos.

The Discovery That Changed My Life

That life changing shift in philosophy didn’t happen at a local farmer's market or at a friend’s dinner party talking with an overly zealous vegan. It happened when a friend of mine introduced me to hunting.  I know, New York and hunting don’t usually mix, but spending entire days in the backcountry surrounded by the calm tranquility of nature opened my eyes to a whole new universe. The game that I hunted and brought home to eat had lived in its natural habitat for its entire life. The closest it had ever come to hormones or chemicals or non-native food was probably a leftover can of soda at a campsite.

It was the first time I felt a real tangible connection to what I was eating, and it felt AMAZING.

Soon I started bringing the game back to the city to share with friends. I wanted to introduce everyone I knew to this sensation I was feeling. Lucky for me, I live in Harlem, home to a strong community of lovers of good food, good wine and thought provoking dinner parties.

Bringing people together with good food and good wine.

Bringing people together with good food and good wine.

My friends instantly felt the same connection I did. They loved the more intense flavors and that the food tasted like real food. It dawned on me that something deep inside us all wants that subconscious knowledge that our food came from the right place and arrived on our plates in a humane way. They were as hooked as I was, so I started looking for a more regular source of naturally raised meat.

The answer was 100% grassfed beef.

I became obsessed with learning about the process and how grassfed meat is the best answer to America’s hyper-industrialized and mechanized agricultural industry. The more I learned, the more I discovered why grassfed beef was truly amazing. I began to understand red meat as a whole has earned a bad rap because your average supermarket beef is about as healthy as the mystery meat in a fast food burger. I learned how and why grassfed beef is actually a movement towards sustainability, and works in a symbiotic relationship with many of the organic produce we eat. How grassfed beef is rich in healthy nutrients, vitamins and minerals. 

Photo credit: Glen Mary Grassfed

Photo credit: Glen Mary Grassfed

The Start Of Something Special

That’s when the stars aligned. One of my closest friends owns a farm in southern Maryland that just so happened to raise some of the best tasting and most humanely raised grass-fed beef on the East Coast. Glen Mary Farm is a beautiful slice of family run farming, where they still speak the language of the land. Because when the needs of land are met, everyone benefits. The animals eat better, live healthier, and we’re rewarded with the gift nature intended to give: wholesome, delectable and nutritious meat. The farm is nestled into the gently rolling hills of southern Maryland, overlooking a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. If there’s a place worthy of being called heaven on earth, it’s Glen Mary Farm.

Hamlet Meats Is Born

With help from my friends at Glen Mary, I was able to transform this labor of love, my passion, into Hamlet Meats.

Why call it Hamlet, you ask? Hamlets are a protected community within a larger community. Which is exactly how this company started – by small groups of like-minded people who were looking to protect and preserve the integrity of the food they were eating and sharing with loved ones.

Each farm Hamlet partners with is hand picked for the care they give their animals, the attention to their diets, the quality of their life, and how humanely they’re killed.

100% Grass-Fed Beef

100% Grass-Fed Beef

My vision for bringing grassfed meat to New Yorkers was born from the swell of pride and love I felt when I first started this journey. I want every New Yorker to have the chance to feel the same way I did. So I made sure that Hamlet was tailored to the unique needs of New Yorkers. That’s why each meat share is skillfully packaged by local small batch USDA butchers. This minimizes waste of the animal, and curates portions so it never hogs precious freezer space. And to make the process as pain free as possible, every meat share is delivered right to your door, for free.

Know where food comes from. Care about the story behind it. Love the way the animal was raised. And I promise you, every meal you eat will be filled with the most satisfying food you’ve ever tasted.

- Josh Ott
Founder, Hamlet Meats
Harlem, NY

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How To Cook A Perfect Steak in Any Sized NYC Apartment

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How To Cook A Perfect Steak in Any Sized NYC Apartment

Are you stranded in a walkup, depressingly far from a grill? Is your apartment so cramped that the thought of cooking makes your skin crawl from claustrophobia? Do you think a perfectly done, home cooked steak is out of reach?

Think again.

You may not have access to a charbroiling grill, but there are a few techniques that are easy to master that will have you cooking a steak like a Peter Luger pro.

Option 1: The pseudo grill

Everyone should have at least one cast iron pan. If you don’t, no judgement.  But you should absolutely consider getting a cast iron grill pan. Lodge makes great ones that can be found on Amazon for around 13 bucks.

How it’s done

Cooking on this cast iron pan is akin to using an actual grill, minus the fire. Just heat the pan over medium high heat for five minutes and then cook the steak, 4-5 minutes each side. You’ll be rewarded with an jaw dropping steak with perfect grill marks to boot.

 

Option 2: Pan Roast

This is a more sophisticated path to a properly cooked steak and one used by many restaurants. It requires both your oven and stovetop, the perfect opportunity to flex its culinary muscles.

Yes, a pan roast is even possible in this magnificently puny New York kitchen.

How it's done

First, preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Then heat a cast iron, stainless steel or oven proof pan over high heat, and sear your steak for about a minute on each side. After both sides have been seared, toss the pan into the oven for 6-7 minutes and it will come out perfectly medium rare.

Option 3 (The Holy Grail): The Reverse Sear

This is by far the most efficient, reproducible and foolproof way to cook a steak. In fact, it’s so good that you might even find yourself foregoing the chance to use a grill (GASP!). In defiance of conventional wisdom, and any charcoal BBQ aficionado friends who might be trying to help, the reverse sear starts by cooking the steak low and slow in the oven.

The result is a temperature perfect steak, with a drool worthy crust and no bullseyeing (explained below).

How it’s done

Start by preheating your oven to 250 degrees. Place your steaks on a rack and cook for 25-35 minutes (take them out as soon as they hit 125 degrees internally). Then let them rest for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, heat a pan over high heat until it’s ripping hot, season your steak and sear on both sides for about a minute each side. Your steak will come out perfectly medium rare with a beautiful crust.

Those are Hamlet Meat’s insider tips for New Yorkers looking to cook a perfect steak. Just make sure to wrangle your smoke alarm or warn your neighbors before you start searing at high temperatures.

- Josh Ott
Founder, Hamlet Meats
Harlem, NY

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How Hamlet Stacks Up To Health Guru David Asprey’s Beef Standards

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How Hamlet Stacks Up To Health Guru David Asprey’s Beef Standards

We recently posted our own piece about the health of grass fed beef (read it here), but this video is an incredibly thorough and scientific look at the amazing health benefits of grass-fed beef.

Oh, we should also mention it was created by David Asprey, who is somewhat of a hero here at Hamlet...What? Meat companies can have celeb crushes, too, you know.

The Biggest Takeaway

Grass feeding cows entirely reverses the nutritional value of red meat. The fat is actually good for you!

Judgement Time

So, where does Hamlet rank in Asprey’s hierarchy?

Technically...#2

Why not the Gold Standard, you ask?

Simple. Our partner farms are located in the Northeast. Where it gets cold during winter. The animals there have to spend time in a farm to stay warm and healthy. While they’re there, the best food we have to feed them is silage, or hay.

GASP!...Silage?

Yes, silage. But all of our silage or hay is completely organic, so the animals’ diets stay 100% pure.

See the whole post at Bulletproof’s website.

- Josh Ott
Founder, Hamlet Meats
Harlem, NY

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The Shocking News That Red Meat Is...Good For You?

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The Shocking News That Red Meat Is...Good For You?

You don’t need a health nut to tell you that red meat isn’t great for you. Google is more than happy to serve up a piping hot platter of nutritional wisdom that clearly demonstrates just how bad red meat is. But what if our commonly held belief of red meat as a slow, silent killer isn’t exactly true?

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5 Compelling Reasons Why You Should Try A Meat Share

In the past few years, being a meat lover has come under fire. Beef has been lambasted in the news, in blogs and on social media for being unhealthy, bad for the environment, and a heartless industry that rightfully deserves our collective indignation.

And you know what? They’re right. That shrink-wrapped beef that’s suffocating at your average supermarket is bad.

Pretty bold for a company that produces meat to say, right? Well, we’re saying it because it’s the truth and it needs to be said; beef doesn’t have to be bad and you should be able to enjoy it without giving your conscience a conniption.

So, what are we  (the sustainable meat producers) doing about it? Why should you believe that our beef is any different? Here are five reasons why:

1. Grass Fed = Healthier Cows = Healthier Meat

The more wholesome and natural an animal’s diet is, the more healthful the meat they produce will be. It’s common sense. Grain-fed animals are forced to eat food with little to no variety and it makes them sick. In fact, the reason cows are fed antibiotics is because they literally can’t stomach the grain they’re fed. 100% Grass-fed cows, on the other hand, aren’t given antibiotics because most of the time they don’t need it. Eating naturally and foraging for food gives the animals all of the necessary nutrients they need to be healthy. And their diet has a profound impact on the nutrient content of the meat they produce. Compared to grain-fed beef, grass-fed beef has much less fat, fewer calories, and more heart-healthy omega 3s. Grass-fed beef also has noticeably higher amounts of CLA, which helps fight cancer, and contains more Vitamin E, a strong antioxidant. After all, you are what you eat—and what your food eats too.

2. You’re Helping More Than Just The Animals

Everything starts with the earth, literally. Healthy soil is the key to environmentally friendly agriculture, and a great way to preserve soil fertility is to allow animals to graze. The farms our animals come from are enriched by the animals and plants naturally which mean the fields and animals can thrive without the use of pesticides, hormones and antibiotics. (For more information, check out Allan Savory and Holistic Management International.)  

3. You’re Directly Supporting Farmers Who Care About Your Food

There’s something that we’ve lost with big chain supermarkets and the massive agro-businesses that supply them, and that’s our connection with where our food is coming from. Each meat share you buy directly helps to support local farms and farmers. These are hardworking folks who are committed to sustainable agriculture and organic foods. They’re the people you see behind the stand at your local farmer's market, and they really do care about producing high quality food that deserves to be put on your plate. Every time you buy a meat share, you’re doing something good for the community and, because it isn’t shipped from overseas, you’re helping to lower the carbon footprint.

4. It’s Healthy Meat That Fits Your New York Sized Life

An important goal with our Meat Shares is to make sure it fits the lives of New Yorkers. We know you don’t have time to go to that out-of-the-way specialty butcher or wait in long lines at the supermarket. So, we prioritize convenience. And unlike other meat CSAs, we don’t drop off half a cow on your doorstep. Our shares are portioned to be fridge and freezer friendly, meal sized, and easy to quickly get on a plate for dinner.

5. A Meat Share Inspires Culinary Creativity

Let’s face it: even though it’s one of the most delicious proteins on the planet, even a ribeye steak can get old after a while. A meat share gives you access to the lesser known, harder working, often more flavorful cuts of meat. You know, the stuff chefs use. It’s a way to mix things up and try new recipes and different preparations. Plus, a meat share uses more of the animal, so less meat is thrown away, and, in the end, fewer animals feed more people.  

So there, that’s five reasons to add more meat to your diet. We could go on and on, but there’s one more reason why a meat share is the answer to your meat woes and (between us) it might be the best one. Flavor. The deepest, most savory, meatiest-meat-you’ve-ever-tasted flavor. It’s a flavor that you just can’t find in store-bought, grain-fed beef.

Ready to dig in? Go on ahead then, and buy some meat.


- Josh Ott

Founder, Hamlet Meats

Harlem, NY

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February Party Recipe Guide Infographic

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February Party Recipe Guide Infographic

Enjoy this holiday guide infographic for finding crowd-pleasing, grass-fed beef recipe ideas to plan your February eating and entertaining events.  Find meals for the Super Bowl, the Oscars, Mardi Gras, Chinese New Year and Valentine's Day.  Meat up, New York!

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Roasted Beef Bone Stock

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Servings: 8-10 people

Roasted Beef Bone Stock
The trick to making a flavorful, complex beef bone stock is to pre-roast all the ingredients before simmering slowly. The roasting results in a much heartier stock that holds up in soups, sauces, and braises.

Ingredients:
4 lbs beef bones, a mix of marrow bones and knuckle bones
4 medium carrots, split
4 celery stalks, split
2 medium onions, peeled and halved
1 head of garlic, halved so that root end remains intact
1/2 bunch flat leaf parsley
2-3 bay leaves
1/4 tsp whole black peppercorns

Pre-heat oven to 450° :
1. On a baking sheet roast bones,turning occasionally for 20–30 minutes, until beginning to brown. Split carrots and celery, add to pan along with onions and garlic. Continue to roast, turning occasionally until vegetables are browned, about 25–30 minutes longer.

2.Transfer bones and roasted vegetables to a large stock pot. Add enough cold water to cover. Pour off fat from baking sheet and add ½ cup water and 1 tbs Apple Cider Vinegar and stir, scraping up any browned bits. Add this liquid to the pot along with parsley, bay leaves, and black peppercorns. Bring pot to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 4 hours. It can be the gentlest simmer. Occasionally skim foam and fat from surface and add water as needed. Strain stock into clean glass containers

This recipe will last up to a week in the fridge and in the freezer up to 3 months.
Servings: makes 3 quarts

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Oven Braised Short Rib Ragu

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Oven Braised Short Rib Ragu

This style of sauce gives the best of both--short ribs end up succulent and perfectly cooked while braising eliminates the need for labor intensive stirring that a traditional ragu usually demands. To keep dinnertime hassle to a minimum this recipe can be made in one pot, enameled cast iron would work the best.

Ingredients:

  • 5 lb bone in short ribs
  • tempered salt
  • fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp. animal fat or neutral oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 2 large carrots, split and diced
  • 1 medium bulb fennel, cored and diced
  • 3 large cloves garlic, smashed
  • 2 tbsp. tomato paste
  • 1 tbsp. anchovy paste
  • 1/2 bottle red wine
  • 1 tbsp. dijon mustard
  • 2­-3 dash Worcestershire sauce
  • 15 oz can of whole tomatoes, crushed with a spoon
  • 2 bay leaves
  • a handful of aromatic herbs tied in a bundle thyme, oregano, rosemary, sage
  • water or chicken stock

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°
  2. Season ribs liberally with salt and black pepper, allow meat to temper for a better and more even cooking. Heat oil or fat in a large, heavy bottomed pot (break out your enameled dutch oven or a large oven­ ready pot!) over medium heat until shimmering. Working in batches, brown the ribs 2­3 minutes per side then set aside. In the same pan sauté onion, carrot and fennel until translucent. Add garlic and gently warm until fragrant but not browned.
  3. Using a spatula, move vegetables to the sides of the pot to create a hot spot then add tomato and anchovy paste into the center. Stir until caramelized, then incorporate into the vegetables. Add red wine and cook until liquid is reduced by half. Add tomatoes, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, bay leaves and aromatic herbs.
  4. Add ribs back into the pot and fill with water or chicken stock until nearly covered. Bring the liquid to a boil then cover with a layer each of unwaxed baking paper and baking foil. Braise in oven for 3 hours or until the ribs are falling easily off the bone.
  5. Remove ribs from liquid while braise is hot and set them aside to cool. Remove bay leaves and herb bundle. For a smoother sauce, purée braising liquid and vegetables with an immersion blender to the texture of your choice. If sauce seems thin, set over low heat to reduce. When ribs are cool enough to handle, strip meat from the bones discarding any large pieces of fat, and mix to incorporate into sauce.
  6. Serve over polenta or your favorite pasta with fresh herbs and a sharp hard cheese. This is a recipe that benefits from a night in the fridge, so don’t be daunted by this big batch and savor the leftovers!

Servings: 8­ - 10 people
 

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A More Direct Approach

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A More Direct Approach

We’ve never been the kind of guys to worship outdoor grilling gear and technology. When we were growing up, Dad set the tone, making do with a rusty hardware store hibachi and a metal chimney. We’ve written about the ascetic thrill of using government-issue grills in state parks.

But recently we picked up a trick from a Dallas chef that has rocked our minimalist approach to its foundation: We cook meats directly on the coals.

No, the precious porterhouses do not incinerate, even though the heat is consistently 800 to 1,000 degrees. The char is robust and earthy, but never too ashy or excessive, even when we use thinner cuts like hanger and skirt.

In fact, the method promises to reduce anxiety at our outdoor parties this summer by making the grilling speedier and more consistent, with far less sooty flare-up than when we raise our steaks a few inches onto a grate above the coals. (That air space between the meat and the heat provides oxygen for combustion.)

Thank Tim Byres, an evangelist for live-fire cooking in his Smoke restaurants, who demonstrated the technique in May for a segment of our new TV show, “Southern Uncovered,” on Ovation.

The producers were secretly hoping for an Icarus moment, some kind of spectacular calamity on the restaurant’s 10-foot-long open fire pit, but the only pyrotechnics were in our brains; this simple act demolished everything we thought we knew about cooking proteins.

Even Mr. Byres’s richly marbled five-pound “Eisenhower steak” (a Brobdingnagian rib-eye with short rib attached, about two feet long), when cooked 10 minutes on each side, emerged with just a couple of silver dollars’ width of char.

The sugary, spicy dry rub he had patted into the beef before it hit the fire caramelized into a nice crust with that crave-worthy wisp of smoky bitterness that is the objective of outdoor cooking, and so welcome against the sweet richness of luscious protein and browned fat.

He credits President Dwight D. Eisenhower, a native of Denison, Tex., with turning him on to this technique.

“I heard a rumor of Ike grilling these really thick four-inch sirloins,” said Mr. Byres, who tracked down a 1953 article in The Miami Daily News that confirmed his hunch: Eisenhower, it said, “rubs the steak with oil and garlic and then, as the horrified guests look on, casually flings the steak into the midst of the red and glowing coals.”

It should be noted that only natural chunk charcoal (not briquettes) ignited in a chimney is recommended, so that wood is the only ingredient touching the meat.

Continue reading the main story

 

 

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Recipe: Mint-Pesto Rubbed Lamb

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Recipe: Mint-Pesto Rubbed Lamb

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 5-to-6 pound leg or rib of lamb
  • 3/4 cup packed basil
  • 1/2 cup packed mint leaves
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped rosemary
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 lemon, halved and seeded
  • 1 tablespoon course salt
  • 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)


DIRECTIONS

  1. Remove excess fat from lamb, leaving a thin layer. Set lamb aside.
  2. In food processor, combine all the herbs.  Drizzle in olive oil and pulse several times until the mixture becomes a pesto paste.
  3. Spread pesto paste over entire lamb.  Cover and refrigerate for 24 hours.
  4. Adjust lower rack to the bottom of the oven.  Preheat to 350 degrees.  Have ready a shallow roasting pan.
  5. Squeeze halved lemons and rub the juice into the meat .
  6. In a small bowl combine salt, pepper, and crushed pepper flakes.  Sprinkle mixture over seasoned lamb and allow to rest for 30 minutes at room temperature.
  7. Transfer meat to shallow pan and roast for 1 1/2 hours, or until a thermometer inserted into thickest part of meat registers 135 degrees for medium-rare.
  8. Transfer to cutting board and tent with foil.  Allow to rest for 15 minutes before carving.

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Meet the Makers: Q&A with Josh Ott & Hamlet Meats

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Meet the Makers: Q&A with Josh Ott & Hamlet Meats

Join Karen Mordechai, creator of Sunday Suppers, and friends as they celebrate a spirited Friendsgiving celebration in her Brooklyn, New York studio.

I recently sat down with the folks at Williams-Sonoma as part of their ongoing blog series "Meet the Makers." Here's the link to our Q&A:

I realized my immediate community was interested in having the same connection with their food, even if they weren’t looking to spend weekends in the backcountry hunting. As my love for the sport and the outdoors grew, I supplemented my own game with kosher-killed, grass-fed beef from my best friend’s farm in Southern Maryland. I spent a lot of my childhood on this farm, so I knew firsthand that these animals spent their days in gorgeous green pastures overlooking the Chesapeake Bay, before they were humanely slaughtered and packaged as food.

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The Importance of Mineralization to Benefit Human Health:

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The Importance of Mineralization to Benefit Human Health:

Higher Welfare = Lower Fat Content:

   - Free-range & organic chicken – up to 50% less fat

   - Slower-growing chicken – up to 65% less fat

   - Pasture-reared beef – 25% - 50% less fat

 

Higher Welfare = Higher Omega-3 Levels:

   - Pasture-reared beef – up to 430% higher

   - Higher welfare chicken – up to 565% higher

   - Higher welfare eggs - up to 170% higher

   - Pasture raised lamb - 30% to 245% higher

   - Pasture produced milk – 50% to 185% higher

 

Higher Welfare = Higher Levels of Antioxidants:

   - Free-range eggs – up to 100% more vitamin E & 280% more beta-carotene

   - Free-range pig meat – up to 200% more vitamin E

   - Higher welfare beef – 335-700% more beta-carotene

   - Higher welfare milk – 60-436% more beta-carotene

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To thaw or not to thaw

If You Thaw Your Steaks Before Cooking, You're Doing It Wrong

The Huffington Post  | By William Goodman

Posted: 08/07/2014 5:57 pm EDT Updated: 08/08/2014 3:59 am EDT

You're in the mood for steak and have some choice cuts in the freezer -- what's your first step?

If you answered "thaw the steaks," prepare to have your mind and palate blown, because you've been doing it wrong according to Dan Souza, Senior Editor of Cook's Illustrated.

In this video above from America's Test Kitchen that challenges conventional wisdom, Souza demonstrates the differences that occur when you cook the frozen versus thawed steaks, and the end results are shocking. "When we tasted them here in the test kitchen, we preferred the cooked from frozen steaks hands down," states Souza.

Along with taste, there are also added benefits in terms of both time and size. Click play to learn how your next steak can be made so much better than ever before.

 

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"Sleep with your butcher"

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"Sleep with your butcher"

A great piece from the forthcoming book "A Carnivore's Manifesto" was published on Medium this week.

He knows where the meat comes from, he can steer you away from inferior choices and toward the best product.

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The Philosophy of Hamlet Meats

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The Philosophy of Hamlet Meats

Hamlet Meats founder Josh Ott

Hamlet Meats founder Josh Ott

I grew up in Suburban Maryland with a big family. I went from there to Boston College where I played football and dedicated much of my life to my teammates and my performance on the field. After a few years of football in Italy, I found myself here—in New York City—working in the cable TV industry. A big family and a dedication to sports meant I was health conscious, but like most of us growing up in suburban / urban America in the 80s and 90s, I never thought twice about the source of my food, and what may or may not be hazardous in the process of a steak or a vegetable going from the farm to my plate.

In my adult life friends introduced me to hunting. Missing the football field, I loved the camaraderie, the strategy, and the glory in tangible success. The element I didn’t predict as rewarding, which ultimately became the most life changing, was bringing home my victories to prepare for friends. Being raised in a big family and finding a strong community in Harlem  I love a big dinner table with good food and wine. I now not only could care for and show love to loved ones through dinners, but also through carefully choosing the game I would prepare based on the personality and preferences of my diners.

As a 33 year old African American male living in the heart of Harlem a universe was quickly unlocked where I knew where my food was coming from, that it had eaten in its natural habitat for its whole life, and that it hadn’t be sprayed, injected, or tortured.  As I became more passionate about this, and shared more and more meals with friends, I realized my immediate community was interested in having the same connection with their food even if they weren’t looking to spend weekends in the backcountry with a rifle.

As my love of hunting and the outdoors grew I supplemented my own game with kosher killed, grass fed beef from my best friend’s farm in Southern Maryland that I practically grew up on. I knew these animals spent their days in gorgeous green pastures overlooking the Chesapeake Bay, before they were humanely slaughtered and packaged as food.

And so, Hamlet Meat was born. Hamlets are a protected community within a larger community. Spending lots of time upstate looking at farmland, camping, and hunting, I constantly came across these small sheltered communities—a concept that was completely new to me. Sharing more wholesome, more conscious, more connected nourishment with friends and family in a sea of questionable, unidentifiable, and mishandled goods was rewarding to say the least. This new passion of mine allowed me to show people love and care in a way I felt was protective—contributing to their well being. I hope that as Hamlet Meats grows, it proves to be a resource and haven for others. A community within a community, where my buyers know each farm is hand picked for the care they give their animals, the attention to their diets, and the manner in which they kill them.

I started three years ago buying one steer from the farm and giving much of that animal away to friends who were interested.  Year two I sold shares oftwo steers at cost to the people who were interested.  Year three I purchased 4 animals and started the business by selling those animals for profit, they sold out relatively quickly…today the demand for a trusted product continues to grow.

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